Giant crocodile eater terrorizing Australian beaches better than sharks

Giant crocodile eater terrorizing Australian beaches better than sharks

Hidden in shallow saltwater crocodile, the length of which, according to experts, is about four meters, was the reason for the closure of the popular Australian beach.

"Cable Beach Broome" length of 22 kilometers is one of the main tourist spots in Western Australia, and attracts thousands of people each year, says Mail Online. However, a popular beach was closed after a crocodile settled in shallow waters and stayed there all day.

Giant crocodile eater terrorizing Australian beaches better than sharks

A local resident Sharon Scoble said that she was amazed at how big was the reptile. "It was a big boy - his head was enormous - she said. - "Water would become red with blood, if he made it to any of the people."

The crocodile, however, showed no signs of aggression, but according to Scoble, he closely watched the people on the beach. Fortunately, the morning of the next day the crocodile left the waters of the beach. Senior officer Wildlife Service Dave Woods said that in his opinion, it's the same crocodile that was seen in a number of places nearby in December. According to estimates, reptile was 3, 5, up to 4 meters in length. The Office is currently looking for an animal to move it to the reserve Malcolm Douglas is located 16 kilometers east of Broome.

Giant crocodile eater terrorizing Australian beaches better than sharks

The crocodile had already managed to attract attention. Last month, he dragged into the water 12-year-old boy. A teenager was arrested predators while swimming with friends in the Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory.

People who saw the incident reported that the crocodile swam to a group of teenagers, and at first tried to bite the 15-year-old boy by the arm, but after the teenager began to fight back, reptile let him go and seized another 12-year-old child, swam.

According to experts, the wet season is the most dangerous time for swimming in the ponds and streams.