Archaeologists have proven that they found the remains of the original King Richard III of England

Archaeologists have proven that they found the remains of the original King Richard III of England

Archaeologists have confirmed that the human remains found at a city car park in Leicester are those of the legendary King Richard III of, who died in battle in 1485.

Archaeologists have proven that they found the remains of the original King Richard III of England

The discovery, which will force to rewrite the textbooks of English history, it was confirmed on the basis of DNA analysis, after investigators found his living descendants. Researchers from the University of Leicester has shown that the remains were traces of ten injuries inflicted by Richard shortly before his death.

Archaeologists have proven that they found the remains of the original King Richard III of England Archaeologists have proven that they found the remains of the original King Richard III of England

More terrifying, however, are injured, indicating the humiliations suffered by the monarch before his death. Experts have identified several injuries to the head (the part of the skull was cut), injury of the chest and pelvic bones, which suggests that the king impaled before his death.

Archaeologists have proven that they found the remains of the original King Richard III of England

Prior to this, it was reported that the found skeleton belonged to a man, who was 25-35 years old at the time of death. Richard was 32 when he died. Recently published pictures also show distinctive curvature of the spine. Shakespeare immortalized by Richard III, as the hunchback king.

Archaeologists have proven that they found the remains of the original King Richard III of England

Referring to the 140 journalists who came from around the world to classified DNA test results, the leading archaeologist of the University Richard Buckley said he remains "undoubtedly" belong to Richard III: "We came to the conclusion that the man exhumed in August 2012 is indeed king Richard III, the last male representative of the Plantagenet line on the English throne. This discovery is truly amazing and can be one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of recent times. "

Archaeologists have proven that they found the remains of the original King Richard III of England

Richard, William Shakespeare depicted as a monstrous tyrant who killed the two princes in the Tower of London, was killed at the Battle of Bosworth with Henry Tudor in 1485. According to historical records, his body was taken in Leicester, is located 15 miles from the battle line, where the monarch's corpse was presented as proof of death. Then his body was buried in the Franciscan monastery.

Archaeologists have proven that they found the remains of the original King Richard III of England

A team from the University of Leicester conducted excavations at the site of the old church and its surroundings, including the place where he was buried Richard III. They began the excavations in the city center in August last year and soon found a well-preserved skeleton.

Archaeologists have proven that they found the remains of the original King Richard III of England

He lay in a rough grave, his hands crossed on his chest so that it was clear - they were bound, when a man was buried.

Archaeologists have proven that they found the remains of the original King Richard III of England

Even to the untrained eye, it was obvious that the man, whose remains were found, was heavily curved spine, as well as the injured back of the head. But archaeologists have not dared to do official statements until the skeleton has not been subjected to a series of tests.

Archaeologists have proven that they found the remains of the original King Richard III of England

Speaking at a press conference at the University of Leicester, a geneticist Dr Turi King told the researchers traced the descendants of Richard, to confirm that the remains do belong to the king. Samples for analysis were taken from the family of Richard III of, one of which is a 55-year-old Londoner Michael Ibsen, whose mother died in 2005, was a direct descendant of Anne of York, eldest sister of the king, and the second man, who wished to remain anonymous.