Teens who used to go to bed, it is better protected against depression

Teens who used to go to bed, it is better protected against depression

Teens who used to go to bed, it is better protected against depression and suicidal thoughts, the researchers suggest. The study was conducted at Columbia University Medical Center. It was attended by more than 15 thousand young people aged 12 to 18 years.

It turned out that the "owls", that is, those who went to bed after midnight were 24% more likely to be depressed than their sverstniki- "larks" go to bed before 10 pm.

As the BBC reports citing journal Sleep, for those who slept less than five hours a day, the risk of depression by 71% higher than those who sleep eight hours.

At the same time it was found that suicidal thoughts visited by 20% more than the "owls" than "larks".

The researchers argue that those who slept less than five hours a day, a 48% higher risk of suicide than their peers who sleep eight hours.

Depression and thoughts of suicide are more common in girls, older teenagers and adolescents who lack parental attention.

Most of the parents demanding that their teenage children went to bed before 22 o'clock. It turned out that the average adolescent sleep 7 hours and 53 minutes, while it is recommended that the daily nine-hour sleep. James Gendvish, head of the group that conducted the study, said that lack of sleep affects the emotional reactions of the brain and leads to attitudes that reduce the ability to withstand daily stresses arising.

This may adversely affect judgment, concentration and cause impulsive actions. "Adequate quality sleep could be a preventative measure against depression and may treat depression," - he added.

"In order to be emotionally healthy, you need to get enough sleep, eat healthy foods and exercise regularly. About 80,000 children and young people (in the UK) suffer from depression, and we still can not provide them with support to help them cope with it and prevent it, "- says Sarah Brennan, head of the organization YoungMinds, dealing with mental health.

"Parents should be given information on where to seek help if they are worried about their teenage children. This will prevent the occurrence of such serious problems as depression, "- says Sarah Brennan.